Often when a Florida child receives an award of child support it is only applicable to one of their parents. This may occur when, pursuant to the child’s parents’ divorce, the child is put in the custody of one parent and the other non-custodial parent is required to provide financial support for their offspring. However, just because the custodial parent is not named in a child support order does not mean that they do not have to provide for their child.

In fact, when a noncustodial parent is ordered to pay child support the assessment of how much they will have to pay may consider the income of the custodial parent. After working through many considerations a court may arrive at an appropriate child support amount for a noncustodial parent to pay that includes what the custodial parent is expected to contribute.

Because children live in the homes of their custodial parents it is presumed that those parents are contributing to the welfare and well-being of their kids on a daily basis. Noncustodial parents, however, do not have as much direct contact with their kids and it is therefore because of this that child support orders and agreements may serve the important role of ensuring kids are supported by both of their parents.

In the end, a child support order may only apply to one parent but in reality both a custodial parent and a noncustodial parent will financially contribute to their children’s development and needs. To find out more about child support and other family law matters, individuals are encouraged to reach out to their trusted divorce attorneys.