A question often raised by non-custodial parents is whether they can modify child support. As long as there is a significant change in circumstances, Florida law allows the payment amount to be modified any time. However, this does not happen automatically and the non-custodial parent will have to file a formal motion with details of specific circumstances underlying the request in the court seeking a review and revision of child support.

In a recent child support dispute case, a famous baseball player could be able to convince the court to reduce his child support payments to an ex-mistress. Under the modified court order, he now only has to pay $14,000 a month in child support, instead of the $20,000 a month that was originally ordered in the last judgment. He contested the earlier child support order citing it was grossly inflated and created a windfall for the mother.

Under the amended court order, the baseball player doesn’t have to pay for back child support. Also he doesn’t have to pay off his ex-mistress’s nearly $1 million house that he helped her buy. However, he has been ordered to pay his ex’s $6,776 mortgage every month. The court also granted relief to the player by revising the original order to pay for the children’s college education. He doesn’t have to pay for it now.

The state courts usually deal with requests for child support modification. The parent looking for the modification must file a formal request with the court to avail benefit of it. The parent must ensure that the request for amendment is filed with the court that issued the original order. Also, in cases where there is an amicable agreement made between the two parents, it must be informed and approved by the court.

People undergoing child support proceedings may seek the advice of a legal professional. The professional may guide the person on appropriate methods and legal remedies available under the law to lower the monthly support payment if the person is not able to afford it.