Child support is an important responsibility that a parent may have to take on when they end their relationship with their child’s other parent. In Florida, the income of both parents is considered when child support payments are assigned. To work through the child support calculations, parents must provide the courts with extensive information about their wages and other sources of income.

While most individuals earn incomes that are commiserate with their education and life experience, in some cases, as courts determine how much child support a parent should pay, they may find that one parent is earning less than what they are capable of. If a parent is deliberately earning less money than they should be earning, a court may impute income to them to raise the amount of money that they will be obligated to provide to their child.

Imputed income is income that a parent would be making if they were not intentionally unemployed or underemployed. Courts must have evidence that parents are intentionally trying to underpay child support before income can be imputed, and individuals who believe their exes may be doing this should talk to their attorneys about it.

Child support provides kids with financial support so their needs are met after their parents split up. Parents who deliberately attempt to avoid child support payments by reducing their earnings may see their plans backfire when imputed income is assigned. More information about child support and its calculation should be sought from Florida family law attorneys.